The Modern Art Notes Podcast (visual art)

Episode No. 461 is a holiday clips episode featuring curator Ann Temkin.

Less than two weeks after opening on March 1, the Museum of Modern Art, New York's exhibition "Judd" was temporarily shuttered as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both MoMA and "Judd" have re-opened. The museum has extended "Judd," the first posthumous retrospective of Donald Judd's work in the United States, through January 9, 2021.

“Judd” was curated by Temkin along with Yasmil Raymond, Tamar Margalit and Erica Cooke.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredSixtyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 3:05pm EDT

Episode No. 460 features critic Nzinga Simmons and curator Elizabeth Turner.

Simmons joins host Tyler Green to discuss the Vanity Fair cover featuring an Amy Sherald painting of Breonna Taylor. Simmons is a PhD candidate in art history and visual culture at Duke University. She was also the inaugural Tina Dunkley Curatorial Fellow in American Art at the Clark Atlanta University Art Museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia and at the Zuckerman Museum of Art at Kennesaw State University. 

Along with Austen Barron Bailly, Turner is the co-curator of “Jacob Lawrence: The American Struggle.” The exhibition, which debuted at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York today (to members), and on August 29 (to the general public). It will be at the Met through November 1. The Metropolitan presentation was led by Randall Griffey and Sylvia Yount.

"The American Struggle" presents Lawrence’s 1954-56 series “Struggle: From the History of the American People.” The paintings offer a revisionist and pictorial history of the first five decades of the American republic, or what Lawrence called “the struggles of a people to create a nation and their attempt to build a democracy.” The exhibition marks the first time in more than 60 years that the paintings have been together. The excellent catalogue was published by University of Washington Press.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredSixty.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:26pm EDT

Episode No. 459 is a listener Q&A episode with critic and journalist Catherine Wagley.

Wagley is a Los Angeles-based critic who writes for a range of publications, including Artnet, Momus, CARLA, and Artnews.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 2:19pm EDT

Episode No. 458 features curators John Rohrbach and Mary Morton.

Rohrbach is the curator of "Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and Modern Photography," which opens on Tuesday, August 18 at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth. The exhibition examines how cabinet cards became the primary format for photographic portraiture between roughly the end of the Civil War and 1900. It shows how photography studios and their customers used photography as a means of personal and individual expression, as well as how cabinet cards reflected celebrity culture. It will be on view through November 1. The exhibition catalogue was published by the Amon Carter in association with University of California Press. It is available from Amazon and through Indiebound for $45.

On the second segment, Mary Morton discusses “True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780–1870,” which is on view at the National Gallery of Art in Washington through November 29.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:33pm EDT

Episode No. 457 features art historian Michael W. Cole and historian John Edwin Mason.

Cole is the author of "Sofonisba's Lesson: A Renaissance Artist and Her Work" which was recently published by Princeton University Press. Cole considers Sofonisba Anguissola's art, how her background, teaching and learning were important to her career and art, and how her relationships with her father Amilcare, her teacher Bernardino Campi, Michelangelo and a series of royals and royal courts resulted in her work -- and in work attributed to her. The book also includes a complete illustrated catalogue of the more than 200 paintings and drawings that have been associated with Sofonisba, and 256 color illustrations in all. Cole is a professor of art history and archaeology at Columbia University. Amazon offers the book for $40; it is also available through Indiebound.

On the second segment, John Edwin Mason discusses his 2018 examination of National Geographic's presentation of race in its flagship magazine and the potential applicability of such an institutional audit to the art museum sector. Mason is a professor of African history and the history of photography at the University of Virginia.

Mason and host Tyler Green discuss National Geographic editor Susan Goldberg's letter to readers from March 2018.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:29pm EDT

Episode No. 456 features museum director Trevor Schoonmaker and art historian Sarah Beetham.

Schoonmaker, the director of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, joins host Tyler Green to discuss how art museums engage America's history. The Nasher, of which Schoonmaker was the chief curator before becoming director earlier this year, is a sector-leader in addressing under-represented histories in its collecting, exhibition and programming practices.

Beetham is an assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She came onto the program in May 2019 to discuss art and its relationship to monuments and memorials in the United States. Beetham's forthcoming book on the subject is titled “Monumental Crisis: Accident, Vandalism and the Civil War Citizen Soldier.” It will examine how monuments have become central to a range of American discourses in the decades since the Civil War.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 2:33pm EDT

Episode No. 455 features curator Ilona Katzew and artist Lava Thomas.

Katzew is the department head and curator of Latin American Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She joins host Tyler Green to discuss how she tries to do her work, especially investigation, research, and acquisition, at a time when the pandemic is challenging researchers to find ways to work without traveling to sites or the usual institutional resources (such as libraries).

On the second segment, artist Lava Thomas discusses her experience with the San Francisco Arts Commission and the San Francisco board of supervisors regarding her proposed monument to Maya Angelou for the entrance to the San Francisco Public Library on Civic Center Plaza. Thomas had been the SFAC's top choice for the Angelou monument until a member of San Francisco's board of supervisors objected, demanding a simple, straightforward bronze statue.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:24am EDT

Episode No. 454 features art historian Diane Waggoner and curator and historian Paul Farber.

Waggoner is the author of "Lewis Carroll's Photography and Modern Childhood" which is new from Princeton University Press. The book examines how Carroll's photographs of children helped inform changing English ideas about childhood during the Victorian era. Amazon offers it for $60. Waggoner is a curator at the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

On the second segment, Farber discusses Monument Lab's recent two-year research residency at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in Saint Louis. Farber is the co-founder of Monument Lab, a public art and history studio that cultivates conversations around civic monuments.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 3:47pm EDT

Episode No. 453 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Naima J. Keith and Kelli Morgan.

Along with Diana Nawi, Keith is the curator of the forthcoming Prospect triennial, "Yesterday We Said Tomorrow," in New Orleans. The fifth edition of Prospect was scheduled to open this fall, but was postponed a year, to Oct. 23, 2021, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (The exhibition will now run through Jan. 23, 2022.) Keith joins host Tyler Green to discuss what postponing a 51-artist show requires, especially for artists who had built schedules around a 2020 time-frame, how postponing an exhibition of new work originally scheduled to open just a couple weeks before an American presidential election may change it, and more.

In addition to co-curating Prospect 5, Keith is the vice president for education and public programming at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

On the second segment, Indianapolis Museum of Art curator Kelli Morgan discusses the challenges and opportunities within presenting permanent collection galleries of nineteenth-century American art when most American art museums' collections of the period consist of primarily white artists.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:41pm EDT

Episode No. 452 is a holiday clips episode featuring artist Beuford Smith and art historian Shaina Larrivee.

Smith is featured in two exhibitions that are on view at recently re-opened American art museums: "Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power" at the MFA Houston, and "Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Hedda Sterne Foundation director Shaina Larrivee discusses “Hedda Sterne: Imagination & Machine” at the Des Moines Art Center.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 3:54pm EDT

Episode No. 451 features art historian Kathleen Pyne and curator Melissa Yuen.

Pyne is the author of "Anne Brigman: The Photographer of Enchantment," which was published by Yale University Press. "Brigman" details Brigman's life and work, with a special emphasis on her pictorialist successes of the early twentieth century. Pyne is professor emerita of art history at the University of Notre Dame. Amazon offers "Brigman" for $53.

On the second segment, Sheldon Museum of Art curator Melissa Yuen details recent Sheldon acquisition of works by Analia Saban, Rackstraw Downes, Stanley Whitney and Carlos Almoraz.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFiftyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:39pm EDT

Episode No. 450 of is a listener Q&A episode with critic Jillian Steinhauer.

Steinhauer is a New York City-based critic who writes for a range of publications, including the New York Times, The New Republic and The Nation.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFifty.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:05pm EDT

Episode No. 449 features author Nicole R. Fleetwood and curator Allegra Pesenti.

Fleetwood is the author of "Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration," an examination of how the imprisoned have turned to art-making in an attempt to resist the brutality and depravity of American imprisonment. The book was published by Harvard University Press. Amazon offers it for $30.

An exhibition of the same title is forthcoming at MoMA PS1. It was curated by Fleetwood and Amy Rosenblum-Martin, with Jocelyn Miller. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, MoMA PS1 has yet to announce opening and closing dates for the exhibition. A museum spokesperson said that the exhibition will open whenever the museum re-opens. "Marking Time" features art made by people in prisons and by non-incarcerated artists concerned with issues related to repression and imprisonment in America.

Fleetwood is a professor of American Studies and Art History at Rutgers University.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Allegra Pesenti discusses several recent acquisitions at the Hammer's Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:09pm EDT

Episode No. 448 features artist Dread Scott.

Scott's 2015 "A Man Was Lynched by Police Yesterday" is one of the major American artworks of the decade, and is sadly, immediately relevant in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police last week.

For thirty years, across sculpture, installation, performance, photography and video, Scott's art has relentlessly addressed the racism within and failures of the American system.

Scott's work is in the collections of art museums such as the Whitney Museum of American Art and the New Museum, both in New York, and the Brooklyn Museum. He recently presented "Slave Rebellion Reenactment," a performance which re-enacted a march by formerly enslaved people to seize Orleans territory in 1811. Scott is collaborating with two-time MAN Podcast guest John Akomfrah to make a film installation based on the performance's ideals.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:40pm EDT

Episode No. 447 is a post-holiday weekend clips episode featuring artist Mark Dion.

This week, Amazon Prime Video debuted "The Perilous Texas Adventures of Mark Dion," an hour-long documentary showing how Dion re-traced the steps of four nineteenth-century Texas explorers: Sarah Ann Lillie Hardinge, Charles Wright, John James Audubon and Frederick Law Olmsted. The film, which premiered on Texas PBS stations, was directed by Erik Clapp and produced by Maggie Adler.

The Amon Carter Museum exhibition chronicled by the documentary is also titled "The Perilous Texas Adventures of Mark Dion." Curated by Adler, it features both Dion's discoveries and related works from its collection. The exhibition's closing date is TBD.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:09pm EDT

Episode No. 446 features artists John Edmonds and Tamara Johnson.

This month the Brooklyn Museum had planned to open "John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance," an exhibition of 25 new and recent pictures including portraits and still-lifes of Central and West African sculpture, including works in Brooklyn's own collection (some of which were donated by writers Ralph and Fanny Ellison). Edmonds is the first winner of the Uovo Prize, a new annual exhibition award for an artist living or working in Brooklyn. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the exhibition's opening date is to be determined; it is scheduled to be on view through August 8, 2021. The Brooklyn exhibition was curated by Drew Sawyer. A mural-sized Edmonds, "A Lesson in Looking with Reverence," is installed at Uovo's forthcoming storage facility in Bushwick, where it will remain on view into November.

John Edmonds is also included in "Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition" at the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC. The museum has extended the show through January 3, 2021. "Riffs and Relations" offers works by African American artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries alongside works of the European modernists whose work they engaged. The exhibition includes art from Edmonds's "Tribe" series, which examines early modernism. The exhibition was curated by Adrienne L. Childs, who was recently on Episode No. 444.

On the second segment, Tamara Johnson discusses her installation of Deviled Egg and Okra Column (2020) at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. The Nasher is temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but it has scheduled installations for its new "Nasher Windows," series of exhibitions sited within the Nasher’s entrance vestibule on Flora Street. ("Nasher Windows" installations may be seen from outside the institution's Renzo Piano-designed building.) Johnson's sculpture goes up Friday, May 22, and will remain on view through Wednesday, May 27.

Johnson is a Dallas-based artist who has previously exhibited her work at CUE Art Foundation, New York, in Maria Hernandez Park in Bushwick in partnership with the NYC Parks and Recreation Department, at Wave Hill in the Bronx, and at and in partnership with Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City. Along with Trey Burns, she operates the Sweet Pass Sculpture Park in West Dallas. Sweet Pass presents the work of early and mid-career artists in an outdoor setting, and on a rotating basis.

Johnson and host Tyler Green mention Paulina Pobocha's 2018 presentation of Brancusi at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Pobocha discussed the exhibition on Episode No. 353.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:31pm EDT

Episode No. 445 features curator Eleanor Jones Harvey.

Harvey is the curator of "Alexander von Humboldt and the United States: Art, Nature, and Culture" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington. The exhibition examines the impacts of Humboldt's six-week visit to the United States in 1804, and how his influence extended into American art, science, literature, diplomacy, and more. SAAM is temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; it is unclear when the exhibition will re-open and close. The excellent exhibition catalogue was published by Princeton University Press.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:17pm EDT

Episode No. 444 features curator and historian Adrienne L. Childs.

Childs is the curator of "Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition" at the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC. The museum has extended the show through January 3, 2021. "Riffs and Relations" offers works by African American artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries alongside works of the European modernists whose work they engaged. The exhibition catalogue includes contributions from Childs, Renee Maurer, Valerie Cassel Oliver and Dorothy Kosinski. It was published by Rizzoli Electa. Amazon offers it for $43.

Nota bene: This conversation was recorded before the death of artist, historian and collector David C. Driskell.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:29pm EDT

Episode No. 443 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features author Blake Gopnik.

Gopnik is the author of "Warhol," a new biography of artist Andy Warhol. The book was published by Ecco, a HarperCollins imprint. Amazon offers it for $34.

Gopnik was formerly the art critic at the Washington Post and Toronto's Globe and Mail.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:12pm EDT

In a special pandemic bonus episode, art museum directors Sabine Eckmann (Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in Saint Louis) and Rebecca Rabinow (Menil Collection, Houston) discuss operating art museums in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Direct download: MANPodcastCOVAD19bonus14.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:16pm EDT

Episode No. 442 features curators Nathaniel Silver and Alison de Lima Greene.

Silver is the curator of "Boston's Apollo: Thomas McKeller and John Singer Sargent" at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The museum is temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; pending re-opening, it has extended the exhibition through September.

The exhibition examines Sargent works for which McKeller, an elevator attendant at Boston's Hotel Vendome, modeled. Those works include the Sargent murals in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and drawings. The exhibition also includes historical materials that animate McKeller's life and his engagements with Sargent. The terrific exhibition catalogue was published by the Gardner and distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $44.

On the second segment, de Lima Greene discusses "Francis Bacon: Late Paintings" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The museum is temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. "Bacon" is scheduled to run through May 25. The exhibition, which was organized by the Centre Pompidou, considers the paintings Bacon made between 1971, as he prepared for a major retrospective at the Grand Palais in Paris, and his death in 1992. The exhibition was curated by Didier Ottinger; de Lima Greene organized the Houston presentation.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:39pm EDT

Episode No. 441 features curator Sarah Eckhardt and author and art historian Anne Monahan.

Eckhardt is the curator of "Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. The VMFA is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; the exhibition is scheduled to be on view through June 14. From Richmond, the exhibition will travel to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Cincinnati Art Museum. The exhibition is accompanied by a revelatory catalogue. Amazon offers it for just $32.

"Working Together" features nearly 180 photographs by 15 of the early members of the Kamoinge Workshop, a collective of Black artists dedicated to photography during the 1960s and 1970s. The exhibition had its roots in the work and archive of Louis Draper, a Richmond-area native who moved to New York in 1957 and who built a community of photographers who came together as the Kamoinge Workshop. In 2015, the VMFA acquired Draper's archive.

On the second segment, art historian Anne Monahan discusses her new book "Horace Pippin, American Modern," a Yale University Press-published monograph about the mid-century American modernist painter. Amazon offers it for $32.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFortyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:38pm EDT

In a special pandemic bonus episode, artists Paul Mpagi Sepuya and Kate Shepherd discuss the extraordinary experience of having an exhibition of new work open and close at just about the same time. 

Direct download: MANPodcastCOVAD19bonus3.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:08pm EDT

Episode No. 440 is an Easter weekend and Passover holiday clips edition featuring author and artist Nell Painter.

Painter is the author of Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over. The “starting over” of the title refers to Painter’s retirement after an elite career as an Ivy League historian to return to college as a sixty-something student — first to take undergraduate studio art courses at Rutgers, then to pursue an MFA at the Rhode Island School of Design. Painter’s memoir details her interactions with students and faculty, and how she tried to think through how to make art after having spent decades teaching and writing history.

Before going to art school, Painter was one of America’s most distinguished historians. She is the Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, at Princeton University. Her books include Standing at ArmageddonSojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol, and the New York Times bestseller The History of White People. She is a past president of both the Organization of American Historians and the Southern Historical Association. Earlier this year, Painter assumed the chairmanship of The MacDowell Colony.

Old in Art School came out in paperback late last year; Amazon offers the Kindle edition for just $4.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredForty.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:45pm EDT

COVAD-19 pandemic bonus episode No. 2. Critics on looking (or not) during a pandemic. 

Christopher Knight is the longtime art critic at the Los Angeles Times. Earlier this year he won the 2020 Lifetime Achievement Award in Art Journalism from the Rabkin Foundation, just the second time that's been awarded.

Antwaun Sargent's most recent book is titled "The New Black Vanguard." His writing regularly pops up in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books Daily, and a whole bunch of other places.

Direct download: MANPodcastCOVAD19bonus2.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:59pm EDT

Episode No. 439 features author and art historian William E. Wallace and curator Julian Brooks.

Wallace is the author of "Michelangelo, God's Architect: The Story of His Final Years and Greatest Masterpiece." The book offers a rich and lively biographical examination of the last two decades of Michelangelo's life, a period when he became the architect of St. Peter's Basilica and other buildings, even as he continued to sculpt and draw.

Wallace is a professor of art history at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the author or editor of seven books on Michelangelo. "Michelangelo, God's Architect" was published by Princeton University Press. Amazon offers it for $21, $16 on Kindle.

Along with Emily J. Peters, Julian Brooks is the co-curator of "Michelangelo: Mind of the Master" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. (The Getty is temporarily closed due to the COVAD-19 pandemic.) The exhibition features 28 drawings, many on sheets that feature sketches on both sides of the paper. It is scheduled to be at the Getty through June 7. The Cleveland Museum of Art, which debuted the exhibition, has produced an accompanying catalogue which is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $29.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 7:57pm EDT

In a special bonus episode, artists Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley, and Ursula von Rydingsvard discuss being artists in the midst of a global pandemic.

Direct download: MANPodcastCOVAD19bonus1.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:18pm EDT

Episode No. 438 features curator Ann Temkin and editor Caitlin Murray.

The Museum of Modern Art, New York has organized "Judd," the first posthumous retrospective of Donald Judd's work in the United States. "Judd" was curated by our guest, Ann Temkin, with Yasmil Raymond, Tamar Margalit and Erica Cooke. The exhibition features over 70 sculptures, paintings, drawings and prints. It highlights Judd's important sculpture practice, especially his eagerness to eliminate many of art's usual pillars, such as narrative or metaphor. While MoMA is temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the exhibition is scheduled to be at the museum through July 11. The show is accompanied by an excellent catalogue. Amazon offers it for $75.

MoMA has posted 80 installation shots from the exhibition and an extensive audio playlist.

On the second segment, Caitlin Murray discusses "Donald Judd Interviews," a new, 1,024-page compilation of over sixty interviews Judd conducted during his career. Murray, the director of archives and programs at Judd Foundation, co-edited the volume with Flavin Judd, the foundation's artistic director. "Interviews" is a companion to the 2016 book "Donald Judd Writings." Both volumes were published by Judd Foundation and David Zwirner Books. Amazon offers "Donald Judd Interviews" for $26.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 2:29pm EDT

Episode No. 437 features artist Renée Stout and curator Mary Morton.

Renée Stout is featured in "Person of Interest," at the Sheldon Museum of Art at the University of Nebraska. The exhibition examines portraiture from the late nineteenth century to the present, with a special emphasis on questions about self-fashioning, cultural memory, gender identity, and the performance of identity. While the Sheldon Museum is temporarily closed due to the coronavirus pandemic, the exhibition is scheduled to be on view through July 3.

Stout has explored many of these ideas throughout her more than 30-year career. Her work, which is often built from assembled found elements but which is sometimes also made from elements made to look as if it was found, addresses identity, spirituality, migration, appropriation and more. Her work is in the collections of museums such as the National Gallery, SFMOMA, the Hirshhorn, the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Detroit Institute of Art, the Dallas Museum of Art, and dozens of others.

On the second segment, Mary Morton discusses "True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780–1870," which is scheduled to be at the National Gallery of Art in Washington through May 3. The NGA is temporarily closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. Morton co-curated "True to Nature" with Ger Luitjen and Jane Munro. The exhibition examines how painting en plein air was a core practice for European artists in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and how they traveled to sites as diverse as the Roman Campagna, the Swiss Alps, the Baltic coast and the streets of Paris to paint outdoors. The exhibition features over 100 oil sketches made by artists such as Corot, Constable, Denis and more.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:49pm EDT

Episode No. 436 features artist Ebony G. Patterson and art historian Shaina Larrivee.

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is showing "Ebony G. Patterson... while the dew is still on the roses...", a survey of work Patterson has made over the last decade. The exhibition originated at the Perez Art Museum Miami, and was curated by Tobias Ostrander. The exhibition is on view at the Nasher through July 12. The exhibition catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $30.

Patterson's installations, tapestries, videos and sculptures wield beauty to address disenfranchised communities, violence, masculinity and the impacts of colonialism. "... while the dew" especially examines her consideration of gardens. Patterson's work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Bermuda National Gallery, and more.

Patterson was previously a guest on The MAN Podcast's monuments-and-memorials program in May 2019.

On the second segment, Hedda Sterne Foundation director Shaina Larrivee discusses "Hedda Sterne: Imagination & Machine" at the Des Moines Art Center. The exhibition, which was curated by DMAC's Jared Ledesma, features work informed by John Deere tractor parts that Fortune magazine commissioned from Sterne in 1961. It is on view through April 15. Larrivee wrote the essay in the exhibition's brochure.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:47pm EDT

Episode No. 435 features curator Elizabeth Hutton Turner and artist Bethany Collins.

Along with Austen Barron Bailly, Turner is the co-curator of "Jacob Lawrence: The American Struggle." The exhibition, which is at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts through April 26, presents Lawrence's 1954-56 "Struggle: From the History of the American People." The series presents a revisionist and pictorial history of the first five decades of the American republic, or what Lawrence called "the struggles of a people to create a nation and their attempt to build a democracy." The PEM exhibition marks the first time in more than 60 years that the paintings have been together. 

The exhibition also features three artists engaging with Lawrence's work and ideas: Derrick Adams, Hank Willis Thomas and Bethany Collins, who presents her America: A Hymnal, a 2017 artist's book featuring 100 versions of the song "My Country 'Tis of Thee," written from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. The song's ever-changing lyrics remain legible, while the tunes that (ostensibly) unify the songs has been nearly burned away in favor of scorch marks and other residue. The gallery includes artist-made wallpaper and a six-track audio recording of six different versions of the song.

Collins's work frequently addresses language, song and how they relate to national and racial identities. She's had solo shows at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, the University of Kentucky and at the Birmingham Museum of Art. Last year alone she was featured in group exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Richmond, Va. 

On June 26 the Frist Art Museum in Nashville will present "Evensong," an exhibition featuring Collins's address of a related song, "The Star Spangled Banner." 

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:12pm EDT

Episode No. 434 features artists Peter Saul and Barry X Ball.

The New Museum in New York City is presenting "Peter Saul: Crime and Punishment," a survey of Saul's career. The exhibition includes 60 paintings Saul has made over the last 60 years, from his investigations of domestic space and consumerism, to his pioneering anti-war paintings of the Vietnam War era, to his arch looks at right-wing politicians (which continue into the present). It is on view through May 31. 

On the second segment, sculptor Barry X Ball discusses his work on the occasion of a career-spanning survey at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. That exhibition, "Barry X Ball: Remaking Sculpture," is on view through April 19. It was curated by Jed Morse.

Ball's sculptures are typically created out of rare stones with the assistance of 3-D scanning and printing technology and CNC milling machines. His work typically addresses and often updates mostly European major work from sculpture's history, such as Michelangelo's Rondanini Pieta or Medardo Rossos. This is Ball's first survey exhibition in the United States; previous exhibitions of his work have been at Ca' Pesaro in Venice, the Castello Sforzesco in Milan, and the Villa Panza in Varese. The fine exhibition catalogue was published by the Nasher.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:47pm EDT

Episode No. 433 features curator Simon Kelly and author/historian Robin Mitchell.

Along with Maite van Dijk of Amsterdam's Van Gogh Museum, Kelly is the curator of "Millet and Modern Art: From Van Gogh to Dali." It's at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 17. The exhibition examines, for the first time, Jean-François Millet's influence on succeeding generations of painters, from Cezanne and Pissarro to Monet, Gauguin and even Homer, Modersohn-Becker, Munch and Picasso. The smart, richly illustrated exhibition catalogue was published by the museums in association with Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $27.

On the second segment, Robin Mitchell discusses her new book "Vénus Noire: Black Women and Colonial Fantasies in Nineteenth-Century France."  The book examines how images of Black women helped shape France's post-revolutionary identity, particularly in response to the French defeat in the Haitian Revolution. Mitchell particularly focuses on Sarah Baartmann, Ourika, a West African girl effectively kept as a house pet by a French noblewoman, and Jeanne Duval, the partner of Charles Baudelaire who was painted (and un-painted) by Courbet and Manet. Mitchell is an assistant professor at California State University, Channel Islands. "Venus Noire" was published by University of Georgia Press. Amazon offers it for $35.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:41pm EDT

Episode No. 432 is a President's Day weekend clips show featuring artist LaToya Ruby Frazier.

The Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University is showing "LaToya Ruby Frazier: The Last Cruze." The exhibition features a new body of work that focuses on the United Auto Workers members at General Motors's Lordstown, Ohio plant. The facility, which had produced automobiles for over 50 years, was recently "unallocated" by GM -- a term-of-art that indicates the plant has been shut down. Until recently it produced the Chevrolet Cruze. Frazier's pictures present members of UAW Local 1112, and tell the story of their lives and the community they've built in northeastern Ohio. On September 14, the day the exhibition opened in Chicago, the UAW's current national contract with the Big Three automakers -- GM, Ford and Chrysler -- ended. The UAW instigate a strike at GM plants. It is already the longest strike against GM since 1970. "The Last Cruze" is on view at the Wexner through April 26. It was curated by Karsten Lund and Solveig Øvstebø.

On Tuesday, February 18, Frazier and documentary filmmaker Julia Reichert, whose American Factory just won the Academy Award for best documentary, will be in conversation with Sen. Sherrod Brown at the Wexner.  (Last year the Wexner organized a touring 50-year retrospective of Reichert's work.) The conversation is free, but an RSVP is strongly recommended to ensure entry.

LaToya Ruby Frazier is a Chicago-based artist whose work most often examines the ways in which corporations have impacted the lives of workers, their families and their communities. Her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at numerous museums in France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and across the United States. She was the recipient of a 2015 MacArthur Foundation 'genius' grant, and has also received awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and USA Artists.

For images of the work discussed on this week's program, please see Episode No. 412.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:04pm EDT

Episode No. 431 features artists Mark Dion and Nancy Lupo.

This weekend, the Amon Carter Museum opens "The Perilous Texas Adventures of Mark Dion." For the exhibition, Dion retraced the steps of four nineteenth-century Texas explorers: Sarah Ann Lillie Hardinge, Charles Wright, John James Audubon and Frederick Law Olmsted, accumulating material and experiences all along. The Carter exhibition features both Dion's discoveries and related works from its collection. Curated by Margaret C. Adler, it will remain on view through May 17. The Amon Carter has published an extraordinary book in association with the project, in some ways an adaptation of and Dion & Co. updating of Olmsted's Texas travel diary, that is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $40.

Dion works at the intersection of art, natural history, history and anthropology. His work examines and often critiques humanity’s approach to nature, landscape and science through witty address of scientific methodologies and installations that often have roots in Victorian-era presentation.

Dion has fulfilled commissions and had exhibitions at museums all over the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate, and the British Museum of Natural History in London. He is also a co-director of Mildred’s Lane, a visual art education and residency program in Beach Lake, Pennsylvania.

Dion was previously a guest on Episode No. 309. Olmsted's books on his travels through Texas and the South are available for free and in multiple formats from the Internet Archive's Open Library. Installation and related Dion images will be available early on the week of Feb. 10.

On the second segment, Lupo discusses her work on the occasion of "Nancy Lupo: Scripts for the Pageant" at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Anthony Edwards, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through March 15. Lupo's previous exhibition credits include the 2018 version of the Hammer Museum's "Made in LA," and solo exhibitions at the Swiss Institute, New York, LAXART, and the Visual Arts Center at the University of Texas.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirtyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 9:46am EDT

Episode No. 430 features artists Alison Rossiter and David Maisel.

Rossiter is featured in "Unseen: 35 Years of Collecting Photographs" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition shares photographs from the Getty's rich collection that have never been shown at the museum, including many Rossiters. The exhibition is organized by Jim Ganz in collaboration with Mazie Harris, Virginia Heckert, Karen Hellman, Arpad Kovacs, Amanda Maddox, and Paul Martineau. It's on view through March 8.

On March 6, Yossi Milo Gallery in New York will debut new Rossiters in "Substance of Density." It will remain on view through April 25.

In just the last couple years, Rossiter has been featured in group exhibitions at the George Eastman Museum, the National Gallery of Canada, the High Museum of Art, the McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, the New York Public Library, the Tate Modern, the Denver Art Museum, the Musee de l'ELysee and Lausanne and the Centre for COntemporary Photography, Melbourne. In 2017 Radius published "Alison Rossiter: Expired Paper." Amazon offers it for $40.

On the second segment, Maisel discusses his new book "Proving Ground." The book presents aerial and on-site photographs made at Dugway Proving Ground, a military facility covering nearly 800,000 acres south of Salt Lake City. The U.S. government uses Dugway to develop, test and implement chemical and biological weaponry and related defense programs. The book is an extended meditation on land use in the American West, secrecy, and the dangers present in that which we can and cannot see. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green wrote an essay for the book. It was published by Radius. Amazon lists it for $65.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirty.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:14pm EDT

Episode No. 429 features curators Sarah Meister and Lauren Palmor.

On February 9, the Museum of Modern Art, New York opens "Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures," the first significant solo presentation of Lange's work at MoMA since this 1966 survey. The exhibition, which is drawn from MoMA's collection, was curated by Meister with River Bullock and Madeline Weisburg. It will be on view through May 9. It is accompanied by a book featuring contributions by Julie Ault, Sandy Phillips, Sally Mann, Wendy Red Star, and others. Amazon offers it for $55.

"Lange" specifically examines the way words -- including Lange's own, which Lange often presented in extended captions, and the words in Lange's photographs -- have guided our understanding of Lange's work.

Host Tyler Green and Meister discuss Lange and Pirkle Jones's 1956 series "Death of a Valley." See each picture on SFMOMA's website.

On the second segment, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco curator Lauren Palmor discusses additions FAMSF made to "Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983."  The exhibition, which is at the de Young Museum through March 15, examines art made during two decades during which Black political and cultural power ascended in the United States. "Soul of a Nation" originated at the Tate Modern and was curated by Mark Godfrey and Zoé Whitley. Palmor and a team of FAMSF curators added a range of Bay Area-made art to the exhibition.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:04pm EDT

Episode No. 428 features curators Courtenay Finn and Jay Clarke.

Finn is the curator of "Margaret Kilgallen: that's where the beauty is." The exhibition, which originated at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum last year opens at moCa Cleveland on Jan. 31 and will be on view through May 17.

On the second segment, Art Institute of Chicago curator Jay Clarke discusses "Käthe Kollwitz: Prints, Process, Politics" which is at the Getty through March 29.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:15pm EDT

Episode No. 427 features artists Sanford Biggers and Michelle Angela Ortiz.

Sanford Biggers's work is on view in "Cosmic Rhythm Vibrations," at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. The exhibition, substantially but not entirely from the Nasher's collection, considers artworks that engage visual and musical rhythm. It was curated by the Nasher's Trevor Schoonmaker and will be on view through March 1.

On April 8, the Bronx Museum of Art will originate a major survey of Biggers's quilts titled "Sanford Biggers: Codeswitch." Curated by Antonio Sergio Bessa and Andrea Andersson, the exhibition will feature around 80 of the quilt-based works Biggers has made between 2009 and 2019. From the Bronx it will travel to New Orleans and Los Angeles. 

On the second segment, Michelle Angela Ortiz discusses her work on the occasion of "When Home Won't Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art" at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The exhibition was curated by Ruth Erickson and Eva Respini and will be on view through January 26, when it will travel to the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. 

Ortiz is a Philadelphia-based artist whose artworks, often made in and for public sites, activate, embolden and advocate for the under-represented. In 2018 she was a fellow at the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage and was a Rauschenberg Foundation Artist as Activist fellow.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:43pm EDT

Episode No. 426 features artist Paul Mpagi Sepuya and art historian/curator ShiPu Wang.

The Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston is presenting the survey exhibition "Paul Mpagi Sepuya." The exhibition originated at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and was curated by Wassan Al-Khudhairi with Misa Jeffereis. The Houston presentation was coordinated by Tyler Blackwell. It's on view at the Blaffer through March 14.

Sepuya's photographs of himself, his friends and his colleagues advance portraiture through layering, fragmentation, confusion and a certain kind of trompe l'oeil. They make us question what we see, how it's constructed, and encourage us to contemplate the relationship between reality and artifice. His work is in the collection of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York (which included his work in "Being: New Photography 2018"), MOCA (where his work may be seen in "The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA's Collection" through January 20), the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

On the second segment, art historian and curator ShiPu Wang discusses "Chiura Obata: An American Modern," a retrospective of Obata's career. Obata, who was born in Okayama, Japan, melded modernism and American landscapes with Japanese traditions to make a body of work that both engaged the United States and critiqued its racism. "Obata" debuted at the Art, Design & Architecture Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and is on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum through May 25. The exhibition catalogue was published by University of California Press.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:25pm EDT

Episode No. 425 is a holiday clips episode featuring curator H. Daniel Peck.

The Hudson River Museum in Yonkers, NY is presenting "Thomas Cole's Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek." The exhibition considers Cole's paintings of Catskill Creek, a 46-mile long river that drains part of the Catskill Mountains and enters the Hudson just below the town of Catskill, as a series. It includes 12 Coles and paintings of Catskill Creek by artists who followed Cole, including Asher B. Durand and Frederic Edwin Church. It originated at the Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, New York.

"Thomas Cole's Refrain" was curated by H. Daniel Peck, a professor emeritus at Vassar College. It is on view through February 23, 2020. Peck is also the author of an excellent accompanying book also titled "Thomas Cole's Refrain." It was published by Cornell University Press's Three Hills imprint. Amazon offers it for $32.

For images of artwork discussed on the program see Episode No. 402.

 

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:38pm EDT

Episode No. 424 is a Christmas-week clips show featuring artist Leonardo Drew.

This weekend, the Hammer Museum debuts a Drew installation in its lobby space, the newest exhibition in its Hammer Projects series. The presentation was organized by Connie Butler and will remain on view through May 10, 2020.

Host Tyler Green's conversation with Drew was recorded in July on the occasion of "Leonardo Drew: City in the Grass," the public artwork Drew created for the Madison Park Conservancy. Next year City in the Grass will travel to the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh as part of an indoor/outdoor exhibition of Drew's work that opens in March.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:11pm EDT

Episode No. 423 features curator Anna Katz and artist Robert Zakanitch.

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles is presenting "With Pleasure: Pattern and Decoration in American Art 1972-1985." The exhibition is the first broad scholarly survey of one of the most important art movements to emerge out out of American feminism. The exhibition features about fifty artists whose work addressed and embraced material typically coded as feminine and thus inferior, including the decorative, domestic, and ornamental. Katz curated the show, which will remain on view in Los Angeles through May 11 before traveling to the Hessel Museum of Art at Bard College. The terrific exhibition catalogue was published by MOCA in association with Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $54.

Robert Zakanitch was one of the founders of P&D art. Starting in the early 1970s, his work turned away from minimalism and color-field painting to embrace motifs most often wielded as decoration. His work is in the collection of museums such as the Tate, MoMA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His most recent museum exhibition was at the Hudson River Museum.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:36pm EDT

Episode No. 422 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Martine Gutierrez and curator Mari Carmen Ramírez.

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth is exhibiting Martine Gutierrez's work in a "Focus" show that spotlights Gutierrez's 2018 Indigenous Woman project. Indigenous Woman is a 146-page fashion magazine-style publication for which Gutierrez acted as editor, writer, advertising producer, model, photographer -- and everything else. It sends up the traditional fashion magazine by expanding its brief to address white supremacy, to advance native cultures and to investigate the fashion industry's construction of beauty. The exhibition was curated by Alison Hearst and will be on view through January 12, 2020.

Gutierrez's work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, at the Boston University Art Galleries, the McNay Art Museum, and at the Contemporary Art Museum, Raleigh. She has been featured in group exhibitions at the Venice Biennale, the New Museum and the Kunstmuseum Bonn. Much of her video and audio work is available on Martine.tv and on Vimeo.

On the second segment, Mari Carmen Ramírez discusses "Beatriz González: A Retrospective," the first large-scale U.S. exhibition devoted to the Colombian artist's career. Ramírez curated the exhibition with the Perez Art Museum Miami's Tobias Ostrander. González is one of the few living artists remaining from Latin America's 'radical women' generation of artists. Her work often examines class, taste, dictatorship, extra-judicial killings, and more. The exhibition debuted at the Perez Art Museum Miami, and is on view in Houston through January 20, 2020. The fine exhibition catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:10am EDT

Episode No. 421 is a holiday weekend clips episode featuring a clip from the Getty's "Recording Artists" podcast series, and artist Robert Pruitt.

The program first features a clip from the Betye Saar episode of the six-part "Recording Artists" podcast series recently released by the Getty. The series, which is hosted by art historian Helen Molesworth, builds on collections at the Getty Research Institute.

On the second segment, a re-air of host Tyler Green's January conversation with Robert Pruitt. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is exhibiting three large-scale Pruitt works as the inauguration of its Banner Project. Pruitt's work depicts members of the Boston community wearing and interacting with works from the MFA’s collection, including an ancient Egyptian beadnet dress, 20th-century Yoruba wrappers, and an American pictorial quilt by Harriet Powers. The exhibition will be on view through the end of 2020.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwentyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:09pm EDT

Episode No. 420 features the second part of a two-part conversation with artist Lari Pittman, and curator George Shackelford.

The Hammer Museum recently debuted "Lari Pittman: Declaration of Independence," a retrospective of Pittman's nearly forty-year career. The exhibition reveals Pittman's engagements with America's history and with issues and subjects that have been core to our history and identity, including landscape, violence, citizenship, belonging and more. The exhibition was curated by Hammer chief curator Connie Butler. It is on view through January 5, 2020.

Along with Esther Bell, Shackelford is the curator of "Renoir: The Body, The Senses." The exhibition focuses on Renoir's art about the human form, and features the work of artists at whose art Renoir was looking intently, as well as art by early modern artists who were looking at Renoir. It's at the Kimbell Art Museum through January 26, 2020.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwenty.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:17am EDT

Episode No. 419 features artist Shirin Neshat and curator Melissa E. Buron.

The Broad is exhibiting "Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again," a career-spanning survey that places special emphasis on Neshat's address of her home country of Iran and her 2010s turn toward addressing the United States and the ways in which the United States has come to resemble Neshat's theocratic homeland. The exhibition was curated by Ed Schad and will remain on view through February 16, 2020. The excellent catalogue was published by The Broad and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $45.

Neshat was previously a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2012 and 2013.

On the second segment, Melissa E. Buron discusses her exhibition "James Tissot: Fashion & Faith," which is on view at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The exhibition examines Tissot's career, his engagement with and distance from impressionism, his multi-national career, and his late-in-life turn toward Biblical subjects (in part to attract American patronage). The exhibition is on view through February 9, 2020. The beautifully designed, smart exhibition catalogue was published by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and DelMonico Prestel.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredNineteen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:06pm EDT

Episode No. 419 features artists Nayland Blake and Ann Hamilton.

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles is exhibiting "No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake." Curated by Jamillah James, the exhibition is the most comprehensive survey of Nayland Blake's art. The exhibition spotlight's Blake's interest on feminism and queer liberation and their investigation of subcultures ranging from punk to the BDSM and leather communities. The exhibition, which is on view through January 26, 2020, will be accompanied by a forthcoming catalogue.

On the second segment, Ann Hamilton talks about her recent work. She's included in "Here: Ann Hamilton, Jenny Holzer, Maya Lin" at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus. The exhibition presents work by three Ohio-born artists whose careers have overlapped with the Wexner's own thirty-year history. Elements of the exhibition extend beyond the Wexner and across The Ohio State University campus and Columbus. It was curaetd by Michael Goodson with Lucy I. Zimmerman and Kristin Helmick-Brunet, and remains on view through December 29.

Hamilton also discusses this recent installation at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredEighteen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:45pm EDT

Episode No. 417 features artist Julie Mehretu and curator Jane Aspinwall.

This weekend, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art opens "Julie Mehretu," a mid-career survey of Mehretu's work. The exhibition will include approximately 40 paintings and 40 works on paper from the first 25 years of Mehretu's career. After closing at LACMA on March 22, 2020, "Mehretu" will travel to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the High Museum of Art, and the Walker Art Center. The exhibition was curated by LACMA's Christine Y. Kim and the Whitney's Rujeko Hockley.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Jane L. Aspinwall discusses her new exhibition "Golden Prospects: California Gold Rush Daguerreotypes." The show argues that the Gold Rush was the first "broadly significant event in American history" to be broadly documented in substantial depth by photography. It includes rich images of San Francisco and of the Sierra foothills transformed by miners in pursuit of gold. It's on view in Kansas City through January 26, 2020, and will travel to the Yale University Art Gallery. 

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredSeventeen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Episode No. 416 features artist Robyn O'Neil. It was taped before a live audience at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

MAMFW is showing a 20-year survey of O'Neil's work titled "Robyn O'Neil: WE THE MASSES." The exhibition spotlights O'Neil's signature works of graphite-on-paper, many of which are multi-paneled. O'Neil's drawings have long addressed the landscape tradition and issues related to climate change, the human presence within nature, human struggles within nature, and the tenuousness and temporality of beauty. The exhibition was curated by Alison Hearst and will be on view through February 9, 2020.

Among the museums that have presented solo exhibitions of O'Neil's work are the Des Moines Art Center and the Contemporary Art Museum Houston. Her work is in many major collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Blanton Museum of Art, the MFA Houston, and of course MAMFW.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredSixteen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:16pm EDT

Episode  No. 415 features artist Lari Pittman.

The Hammer Museum recently debuted "Lari Pittman: Declaration of Independence," a retrospective of Pittman's nearly forty-year career. The exhibition reveals Pittman's engagements with America's history and with issues and subjects that have been core to our history and identity, including landscape, violence, citizenship, belonging and more. The exhibition was curated by Hammer chief curator Connie Butler. It is on view through January 5, 2020. The excellent exhibition catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $51.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFifteen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 9:55am EDT

Episode No. 414 features curators Scott Allan and Emily A. Beeny and artist Xiaoze Xie.

Along with Gloria Groom, Allen and Beeny are the co-curators of "Manet and Modern Beauty," on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum through January 12, 2020. It is the first exhibition to examine the work Manet made near the end of his short life (he died at 51), including portraits, still-lifes, watercolors, cafe and garden scenes and even his correspondence. The excellent exhibition catalogue was published by the Getty. Amazon offers it for $43.

On the second segment, Xiaoze Xie discusses his paintings, video and more on the occasion of "Xiaoze Xie: Objects of Evidence" at the Asia Society Museum in New York City. The exhibition, which was curated by Michelle Yun, is on view through January 5, 2020. Xie was born in Guangdong Province, China before moving to the United States for graduate school at the University of  North Texas in the mid-1990s. His work is in the collections of the MFA Houston, the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin, the Oakland Museum of California and more.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFourteen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:04pm EDT

Episode No. 413 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Tiffany Chung and art historian and museum director Gary Tinterow.

Chung is currently featured in "Unquiet Harmony: The Subject of Displacement" at the Sheldon Museum of Art at the University of Nebraska. The exhibition spotlights how painter Carlos Alfonzo, the collective SUPERFLEX and Chung have examined issues surrounding migration. It's on view in Lincoln through December 31. This episode was taped before a live audience at the Sheldon on September 25.

New York's Tyler Rollins Fine Art is offering a solo show of Chung's work titled "passage of time." It's up through November 2.

Last year the Smithsonian American Art Museum presented "Tiffany Chung: Vietnam, Past is Prologue," a solo show that explored the legacies of the Vietnam War, including on Chung's own family. In recent years she has exhibited in the Sydney, Gwangju and Venice biennials, and in exhibitions at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and SFMOMA.

On the second segment, MFA director and art historian Gary Tinterow discusses Eugène Delacroix's Women of Algiers in Their Apartment (1833-34), which appears to be the first version of Delacroix's great Femmes d'Alger (1834) at the Louvre. The museum announced the acquisition last week; it's already on view.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThirteen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:18am EDT

Episode No. 412 features artist LaToya Ruby Frazier.

The Renaissance Society in Chicago is showing "LaToya Ruby Frazier: The Last Cruze." The exhibition features a new body of work that focuses on the United Auto Workers members at General Motors's Lordstown, Ohio plant. The facility, which had produced automobiles for over 50 years, was recently "unallocated" by GM -- a term-of-art that indicates the plant has been shut down. Until recently it produced the Chevrolet Cruze. Frazier's pictures present members of UAW Local 1112, and tell the story of their lives and the community they've built in northeastern Ohio. On September 14, the day the exhibition opened in Chicago, the UAW's current national contract with the Big Three automakers -- GM, Ford and Chrysler -- ended. The UAW instigate a strike at GM plants. It is already the longest strike against GM since 1970.

LaToya Ruby Frazier is a Chicago-based artist whose work most often examines the ways in which corporations have impacted the lives of workers, their families and their communities. Her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at numerous museums in France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and across the United States. She was the recipient of a 2015 MacArthur Foundation 'genius' grant, and has also received awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and USA Artists.

Direct download: MANPodcastsEpisodeFourHundredTwelve.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 2:38pm EDT

Episode No. 411 features curator Corey Keller and museum director Johanna Burton.

Keller is the curator of "Signs and Wonders: The Photographs of John Beaslsey Greene," at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art through January 5, 2020. Greene, an American who was raised in France, learned photography from Gustave Le Gray and took it to archaeology, melding the two fields at a time when each was in its infancy.

On the second segment. Wexner Center for the Arts director Johanna Burton discusses "Out of Bounds: The Collected Writings of Marcia Tucker." Along with Lisa Phillips and Alicia Ritson, Burton co-edited the volume with assistance from Kate Wiener. The book includes a broad range of Tucker's writing, from essays about artists to lectures she gave about art and issues in the art museum field. Many of the writings are published here for the first time. "Out of Bounds" was published by the Getty Research Institute and the New Museum.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredEleven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:02pm EDT

Episode No. 410 features artist Susan Philipsz and art historian Matthew Simms.

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis is showing "Susan Philipsz: Seven Tears," a semi-survey selected and installed in response to the Pulitzer's building and site. It includes a work the Pulitzer commissioned for its Tadao Ando-designed building, Too Much I Once Lamented. The exhibition is on view through February 2, 2020. It was curated by Stephanie Weissberg.

Philipsz is a Turner Prize-winning artist whose work typically uses sound, often featuring Philipsz's own voice, to address architecture and location. Her recent exhibitions include installations at The Tanks at the Tate Modern in London; the Kunsthalle im Lipsiubau, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden; a House of Austrian History commission, Neue Burg at the Heldenplatz in Vienna, the Baltic Center for Contemporary Art in Gateshead England, the Scottish National Galleries, the Kunsthaus Bregenz, and more. Philipsz was previously a guest on MAN Podcast Episode No. 90.

On the second segment, art history Matthew Simms discusses Robert Irwin: Untitled (Dawn to Dusk), a new book detailing the Chinati Foundation's 1999-2016 Irwin commission of the same title. The book, especially Simms's essay in it, offers a history of the project and the phases through which it passed as it moved toward completion, as well as photographs of the work by Alex Marks. Amazon offers it for $57. Simms teaches art history at the California State University, Long Beach.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTen.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 7:10pm EDT

Episode No. 409 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Andrew Butterfield and artist Stephanie Syjuco.

Butterfield is the curator of "Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence," the first monographic exhibition in the United States to examine Verrocchio, one of the most influential teachers and artists of the early Renaissance. The exhibition opens at the National Gallery of Art on September 15 and continues through January 12, 2020. It includes roughly 50 works by Verrocchio and his students and collaborators, including Leonardo da Vinci, Domenico Ghirlandaio, and Pietro Perugino. The fantastic exhibition catalogue was published by the NGA and Princeton University Press. Amazon offers it for $60.

On the second segment, Stephanie Syjuco discusses her work on the occasion of "Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States," which opens at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis on September 6. The exhibition, which is on view through December 29, was curated by Wassan Al-Khudhairi with Misa Jeffereis. Syjuco is also included in "Less is a Bore: Maximalist Art & Design" at the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston through September 22. It was curated by Jenelle Porter with Jeffrey De Blois.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 10:30am EDT

Episode No. 408 is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired conversation with Stanley Whitney.

The Saint Louis Art Museum will exhibit Whitney's work in "The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection," which opens next month. The show presents many of the 81 artworks by black abstractionists that Monique and Ronald Ollie recently gifted to the museum. Among the artists included in the exhibition are Frank Wimberley, Sam Gilliam, Chakaia Booker, Norman Lewis, Frank Bowling, Ed Clark, Jack Whitten and Whitney. "The Shape of Abstraction" will be on view from September 17 through March 8, 2020. It was curated  by Gretchen L. Wagner and Alexis Assam.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:11pm EDT

Episode No. 406 features curator Mia Fineman and artist Barbara Bosworth.

Fineman is the curator of "Apollo's Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The exhibition surveys how artists have looked at and considered the moon from the dawn of photography (and before!) to the present. It's on view through September 22. The marvelous exhibition catalogue was published by the Met and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $42.

The second segment features Barbara Bosworth, whose work is included in "Shooting the Moon: Photographs from the Museum's Collection 50 Years after Apollo 11," at  the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. It's on view through September 2. Bosworth's work examines the relationship between humans and the natural world. Her work has been surveyed by the Denver Art Museum, the Peabody Essex in Salem, Mass., and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredSix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 9:01am EDT

Episode No. 405 features curators Anna O. Marley and Kirk Nickel.

Marley is the curator of "From the Schuykill to the Hudson: Landscapes of the Early American Republic" at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The exhibition wields PAFA's collection to consider Philadelphia as a significant, even primary locus of landscape painting in the early 19th-century, and that Philadelphia's interest in the genre preceded the better-known Hudson River region painters' interest. It's on view through December 29. The exhxibition catalogue was published by PAFA.

The second segment features Legion of Honor curator Kirk Nickel discussing three major paintings in "Early Rubens." With about 30 paintings and 20 drawings, the exhibition examines work Rubens made from 1609, when he was in his early 30s, until 1621. It was curated by National Gallery of Canada director Sasha Suda, and Nickel. This segment previously ran, in extended form, in May. For images, click here.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 2:18pm EDT

Episode No. 404 features curator Michael A. Brown and choreographer William Forsythe.

Brown is the curator of "Art and Empire: The Golden Age of Spain," at the San Diego Museum of Art. It is just the second American exhibition to join the art and decorative art of Golden Age Spain with art from Spanish-controlled centers such as Antwerp and Naples and the Spanish imperial lands in the Americas and the Philippines. The exhibition features outstanding works by Diego Velázquez, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Francisco de Zurbarán, Juan Sánchez Cotán and by New Spanish painters such as Miguel Cabrera. "Art and Empire" is on view through September 2. The outstanding exhibition catalogue was published by SDMA. Amazon offers it for $39.

Host Tyler Green mentions Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Ilona Katzew's 2018 appearance on the program. It's here.

On the second segment, Forsythe discusses "William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston through September 15. The exhibition presents a series of works that reveal the ways in which visitors consciously and unconsciously move, interact and respond to each other and their own bodies. William Forsythe is the former director of the Ballet Frankfurt and later for the Forsythe Company, which was based in Dresden and Frankfurt am Main. The exhibition was curated by Alison de Lima Greene.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:24pm EDT

Episode No. 403 features artists Lubaina Himid and Sheila Pepe.

The New Museum is presenting "Lubaina Himid: Work from Underneath" through October 6. It is Himid's first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Lubaina Himid was a pioneer of the British Black Arts Movement of the 1980s and '90s. Her work has consistently examined the consequences of colonialism while celebrating the African diaspora, all while making use of the art historical constructs devised by the cultures she critiques. The exhibition was curated by Natalie Bell. The New Museum published an excellent catalogue for the show. Amazon offers it for just $17!

Himid's work has been the subject of recent solo shows at the Baltic Center for Contemporary Art and the Platt Hall Museum of Costume at the Manchester Galleries. She was included in the 2018 Berlin Biennale. Her work is well held by the Tate Britain. She won the 2017 Turner Prize.

On the second segment, Sheila Pepe discusses work of hers on view -- 19 in all! -- in "Queer Abstraction" at the Des Moines Art Center. Pepe's  work often brings craft techniques to sculpture and installation, expanding the possibilities of both technique and media. A recent mid-career survey of Pepe's work, titled "Hot Mess Formalism," originated at the Phoenix Museum of Art and traveled to the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts in Omaha, and to the DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, Mass.

"Queer Abstraction" is on view through September 8. It was curated by Jared Ledesma. The fine catalogue was published by DMAC, but is not yet available online. 

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:27pm EDT

Episode No. 402 features curator and art historian H. Daniel Peck and curator Elizabeth Morrison.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, New York is presenting "Thomas Cole's Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek." For the first time, the exhibition considers Cole's paintings of Catskill Creek, a 46-mile long river that drains part of the Catskill Mountains and enters the Hudson just below the town of Catskill, as a series. It includes 12 Coles and paintings of Catskill Creek by artists who followed Cole, including Asher B. Durand and Frederic Edwin Church. "Thomas Cole's Refrain" was curated by H. Daniel Peck, a professor emeritus at Vassar College and is on view through November 3 before traveling to the Hudson River Museum in Yonkers, NY. Peck is also the author of an excellent accompanying book also titled "Thomas Cole's Refrain." It was published by Cornell University Press's Three Hills imprint. Amazon offers it for $32.

On the second segment, the J. Paul Getty Museum's Elizabeth Morrison discusses "Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World," which she curated with assistance from with Larisa Grollemond. The bestiary is the tradition that brought animals -- both real and imagined -- to the pages of manuscripts, tapestries and to all manner of objects during the Middle Ages. The Getty exhibition includes not just manuscripts and tapestries, but also paintings, sculpture, decorative arts and contemporary works that demonstrate the influence of the 1,500-year-old bestiary tradition. It's on view at the Getty Center through August 18. The terrific exhibition catalogue was published by the Getty. Amazon offers its for $60.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:11pm EDT

Episode No. 401 features artist Leonardo Drew.

The Madison Square Park Conservancy in New York is presenting "Leonardo Drew: City in the Grass." Drew's over 100-foot-long work presents an abstracted cityscape atop a patterned, carpet-recalling panorama. It is on view through December 15. Drew's work is also on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles in "Open House: Elliott Hundley," a collection installation that Hundley curated. It's at MOCA's Arata Isozaki-designed building through September 16.

Leonardo Drew makes sculptures and works on paper from natural materials that Drew has often oxidized, burned or otherwise nudged toward collapse. His work often references American and trans-Atlantic history and social injustice. In 2009 the Blaffer Gallery at the University of Houston organized a mid-career survey of his work.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundredOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:02pm EDT

Episode No. 400 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation between host Tyler Green and Carrie Moyer. 

Moyer is included in "Queer Abstraction" at the Des Moines Art Center, a show which looks at how LGBTQ artists have used abstraction to address sexuality and gender. The show, which was curated by Jared Ledesma, is in Iowa through September 8.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeFourHundred.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 9:29pm EDT

Episode No. 399 is a summer clips episode that features curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Late Years", which has just opened at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth. The exhibition includes canvases Monet made at the end of the nineteenth century and in the mid-1900s, but primarily considers the paintings Monet made between 1913 and his death in 1926. The show debuted this past spring at San Francisco's de Young Museum. "Monet" is at the Kimbell through September 15.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:47pm EDT

Episode No. 398 features artists Harmony Hammond and Anicka Yi.

Hammond is featured in three important exhibitions around the United States. The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Conn.  is showing "Harmony Hammond: Material Witness, Five Decades of Art," a survey of Hammond's career. The exhibition, which was curated by Amy Smith-Stewart, will be on view through September 5. The excellent catalogue, the first hardcover monograph on Hammond's career, was published by the Aldrich and Gregory R. Miller. Amazon offers it for $45.

Hammond is also included in two major summer historical surveys. "Art after Stonewall, 1969-89" is at the Grey Art Gallery at New York University and at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art. It closes at the Grey on July 20; at the Leslie-Lohman on July 21. "Art after Stonewall" surveys the impact the LGBTQ movement had on visual art and culture in the two decades after the Stonewall Rebellion. It was curated curated by Jonathan Weinberg, Tyler Cann and Drew Sawyer for the Columbus Museum of Art, which organized the exhibition. It next travels to the Frost Art Museum in Miami before arriving in Columbus. "Queer Abstraction" is on view at the Des Moines Art Center through September 8. The exhibition, which was curated by Jared Ledesma, examines how LGBTQ artists have used abstraction to address sexuality and gender. It will travel to the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in Overland Park, Kan. An exhibition catalogue is forthcoming.

On the second segment, Anicka Yi, whose Le Pain Sympathetique (2014) is on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles in "The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA's Collection." Organized by Bennett Simpson and Rebecca Lowery, the exhibition is at MOCA's Geffen Contemporary building through January 27. Yi talked with host Tyler Green in 2017 on the occasion of "Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon" at the New Museum in New York.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 10:17am EDT

Episode No. 397 features curators Janet Bishop and Karl Kusserow.

Bishop is the curator of "David Park: A Retrospective," which is on view at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth through September 22. Park was the originator of what has become known as the Bay Area Figurative School, a key response to abstract expressionism that helped make San Francisco one of America's post-war art-making capitals.

On the second segment, Princeton University Art Museum curator Karl Kusserow discusses "Nature's Nation: American Art and Environment," an exhibition he co-curated with Alan C. Braddock. The exhibition offers an ecocritical take on the American landscape tradition through works by nineteenth-century painters, Native American basket-makers, photographers and more. It is on view at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. through September 9. The exhibition catalogue was published by the Princeton University Art Museum and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon lists it at $50.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:25am EDT

Episode No. 396 features artist Sheila Hicks.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is presenting "Sheila Hicks: Seize, Weave Space," an exhibition that presents often site-engaged work both inside the Nasher and in its garden. The exhibition, which was curated by Leigh Arnold, is on view through August 18.

The Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach, Fla. is concurrently presenting "Sheila Hicks: Campo Abierto (Open Field)." It was curated by Frederic Bonnet and is on view through September 29.

Hicks, who has made fiber the foundation of her practice for 60 years, is one of the world's most celebrated artists. Last year in Paris, where Hicks lives, the Centre Pompidou, presented a retrospective of Hicks's career. Her last American retrospective was in 2010, an exhibition that originated at the Addison Gallery of American Art before traveling to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia and the Mint Museum in Charlotte. (The catalogue for the Pompidou show is excellent; Amazon offers it for $31.)

The program was taped before a live audience at the Nasher.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:06pm EDT

Episode No. 395 features curator Kirk Nickel and artist Alicia McCarthy.

The Legion of Honor in San Francisco is presenting "Early Rubens," an examination of the first phase of Rubens's career. With about 30 paintings and 20 drawings, the exhibition examines work Rubens made from 1609, when he was in his early 30s, until 1621. It was curated by National Gallery of Canada director Sasha Suda, and this week's guest, Kirk Nickel of the Legion of Honor. The exhibition is on view in San Francisco through September 8, when it will travel to the Art Gallery of Ontario (where Suda was previously the curator of European art). The excellent exhibition catalogue was published by Delmonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for just $31.

On the second segment, Alicia McCarthy discusses "Alicia McCarthy: No Straight Lines," a major commissioned mural at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. The exhibition was curated by Lucy I. Zimmerman and will be on view through August 1. The Oakland-based McCarthy was the winner of the 2017 SFMOMA SECA Award. Her recent projects have included a 2018 show at the Berkeley Art Museum with Ruby Neri and a building-side mural in downtown San Francisco.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:32am EDT

Episode No. 394 is a holiday weekend clips program featuring John Akomfrah. It was recorded in April, 2018.

The ICA Boston is presenting the U.S. debut of John Akomfrah's Purple. It opens today to East Boston residents and ICA members, to the general public on May 26, and will remain on view through September 2. Purple is a six-channel video installation that addresses climate change and its effect on human communities, biodiversity and the wilderness. The work is installed at the new ICA Watershed.

The interview was taped on the occasion of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University's presentation of Precarity, (2017-18), a work that it commissioned for its collection and that debuted at the Ogden Museum as part of the recent Prospect 4 triennial in New Orleans.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:26pm EDT

Episode No. 393 features artists Suzanne Lacy and Thomas Nozkowski.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts are jointly presenting the retrospective "Suzanne Lacy: We are Here." The exhibition explores Lacy's roots in early conceptualism and her emergence as a pioneer of what has become known as social practice, the use of community organizing and media-focused strategies to prompt events and discussions. The exhibitions are on view in San Francisco through August 4.

On the second segment, a clip from host Tyler Green's 2013 conversation with painter Thomas Nozkowski, who died last week. He was 75. Nozkowski was a painter's painter. He had over seventy solo shows around the world and his work is in almost every major museum collection you can think of, all to little fanfare. His last retrospective was a decade ago, at the National Gallery of Canada.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:10pm EDT

Episode No. 392 features artist and curator Julie Ault and curator Linda S. Ferber.

Ault is the curator of "Nancy Spero: Paper Mirror" at MoMA PS1 through June 23. Spero was a pioneering feminist artist whose work often addressed contemporary events and archetypal representations of women across cultures, all in an attempt to present histories in which women were protagonists. "Paper Mirror" includes over 100 works Spero made over six decades. It is the first major exhibition of her work in the U.S. since her death in 2009.

Julie Ault is an artist whose work frequently consists of curatorial activity as artistic practice. She was a co-founder of the art collective Group Material (1979-1996), and her work has been exhibited in the Sao Paulo and Whitney Biennials. In 2018 she was awarded a MacArthur 'genius' fellowship.

On the second segment, historian and curator Linda S. Ferber discusses "The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists" at the National Gallery of Art. The exhibition examines a group of artists who Ferber and artist Nancy K. Anderson argue coalesced around the ideas of John Ruskin around and after the American Civil War. Their work frequently used nature and landscape to address contemporary politics via metaphor. The exhibition is on view in Washington through July 21.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:26pm EDT

Episode No. 391 looks at art and its relationship to monuments and memorials in the United States and features art historian Sarah Beetham, activist Julia Pulawski and artist Ebony G. Patterson.

Sarah Beetham (Twitter) is an assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She's working on a book titled "Monumental Crisis: Accident, Vandalism and the Civil War Citizen Soldier," a look at how monuments have become central to a range of American discourses in the many decades since the Civil War.

Julia Pulawski is a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and along with artist Annie Simpson is part of an ad hoc group of Chapel Hill activists that erected guerilla monuments to James Cates and an anonymized Negro Wench in Chapel Hill. 

Ebony G. Patterson is an artist whose work updates the memorial form and expands it to include people and groups typically excluded from the American memorial and monument tradition. The Perez Art Museum Miami is presenting a solo exhibition of Patterson's work titled ... while the dew is still on the roses... through May 5.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinetyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:12pm EDT

Episode No. 390 features critic and author Barry Schwabsky and artist Shara Hughes.

Distributed Art Publishers has just published "Landscape Painting Now: From Pop Abstraction to New Romanticism," a look at how painters from all over the world are addressing landscape in their work. It features more than 80 artists and over 400 artworks. Amazon offers it for $43.

The book was edited by Todd Bradway. The text is by Barry Schwabsky, with contributions from Susan A. Van Scoy, Robert R. Shane, and Louise Sørensen.

Schwabsky is art critic for The Nation and the coeditor of international reviews for Artforum, a New York art magazine.

Shara Hughes is a New York-based painter. She has been included in group exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, MASS MoCA and at the Katonah (NY) Art Museum, In 2020 La Consortium in Dijon, France will host a solo exhibition of Hughes's work. Her paintings address both landscape and elements of landscape assembled in sometimes fantastical ways.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredNinety.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Episode No. 389 is a holiday clips episode featuring a previously aired conversation with artist Rachel Whiteread.

After originating at the Tate Britain and traveling to the National Gallery of Art, the 30-year-retrospective "Rachel Whiteread" is at its final stop, the Saint Louis Art Museum. Curated by Molly Donovan and Ann Gallagher, it is on view through June 9. The excellent exhibition catalogue was published by the Tate, which originated the exhibition. Amazon offers it starting at $34.

Whiteread’s work has long explored domestic spaces and objects through casting and the presentation of negative space. Her sculptures have given us new ways to look at familiar places and spaces, and nudge us toward new understandings of the familiar.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 12:46pm EDT

Episode No. 388 features artists Sonya Clark and Analia Saban.

The Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia is exhibiting "Sonya Clark: Monumental Cloth, The Flag We Should Know" through August 4. The exhibition considers a common dishcloth that was used as the flag of surrender by General Robert E. Lee's Army of the Potomac at Appomattox. Sonya Clark's address of the surrender flag asks why we know the infamous Confederate battle flag instead of the South's most prominent surrender flag? The exhibition includes five installations on two of FWM's floors. Clark's work is informed by the original surrender flag, now in the collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

Clark teaches at Amherst College. She is the recipient of a United States Artist fellowship and many other major grants, including a Pollock Krasner Award, the Anonymous was a Woman Award and a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship.  She was a guest on Episode No. 150.

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth's latest "Focus" exhibition features Analia Saban. It includes new work, both tapestry and painting-referencing objects, that address abstraction and the grid via circuit boards and computer chips. As is typical in her work, Saban addresses her subjects through the playful subversion of her materials, in this case copper wire and acrylic paint woven into place. The exhibition is on view through May 12.

Saban has exhibited in group exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, LACMA, the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne and more.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 12:21pm EDT

Episode No. 387 features curator Melissa Ho.

Ho is the curator of "Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-75" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The exhibition examines how artists responded to the war, and reveals the impact the war had on pushing artists into greater engagement with their world. "Artists Respond" is on view through August 18. The exceptional exhibition catalogue was published by Princeton University Press. Amazon offers it for $45.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:31pm EDT

Episode No. 386 features curators George Shackelford and Vesela Sretenović.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Late Years" at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. The exhibition includes canvases Monet made at the end of the nineteenth century and in the mid-1900s, but primarily considers the paintings Monet made between 1913 and his death in 1926. Shackelford is the deputy director of the Kimbell Art Museum, to which the exhibition travels from San Francisco. "Monet" remains on view at the de Young through May 7. The Kimbell published the catalogue, which Amazon offers for $40.

Shackelford discussed "Early Monet" on Episode No. 265. The series of paintings Monet finished just before his death and gave to the French state, now installed in the Orangerie, are presented on this website.

On the second segment, Phillips Collection curator Vesela Sretenović discusses "Zilia Sánchez: Soy Isla (I am an Island)." The exhibition surveys the work Sánchez, a Puerto-Rico based Cuban artist, has made since the 1950s. It is on view at the Phillips through May 19. The exhibition's catalogue, the go-to publication on Sánchez's work, was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $40.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:04am EDT

Episode No. 385 features curators Frederick Ilchman and John Marciari.

Along with Robert Echols, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston curator Frederick Ilchman has organized "Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice" at the National Gallery of Art. The exhibition, the first Tintoretto retrospective in the United States, opens on Sunday and will remain on view through July 7. It includes nearly 50 paintings and over a dozen works on paper. The outstanding exhibition catalogue was published by the NGA and Yale University Press.

On the second segment, Morgan Library curator John Marciari discusses "Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice," a survey of roughly 80 drawings by Tintoretto and his Venetian cohorts. It also opens on Sunday and will remain on view at the NGA through June 9. Its excellent catalogue was published by Paul Holberton Publishing.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:45pm EDT

Episode No. 384 features curators Anne Umland and Esther Gabara.

The Museum of Modern Art, New York is presenting "Joan Miró: Birth of the World." While most of the exhibition comes from MoMA's excellent Miró collection, it is augmented by several key loans, including the early The Table (Still Life with Rabbit) (1920-21). Umland curated the presentation with assistance from Laura Braverman. It is on view through June 15.

On the second segment, Duke University professor Esther Gabara discusses her exhibition "Pop América, 1965-75," which is on view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 21. The exhibition examines how Latin American and Latinx artists engaged with pop art  alongside their American and European peers. The exhibition is accompanied by a terrific catalogue published by the Nasher and distributed by Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $29.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:02pm EDT

Episode No. 383 features artist Yinka Shonibare and art historian Bruce Edelstein.

In the first exhibition of its new contemporary series, the Richard M. Driehaus Museum in Chicago is showing "A Tale of Today." The exhibition surveys Yinka Shonibare's output, including photography and sculpture installations, all presented within a notable Gilded Age mansion. (Shonibare has frequently referred to the excesses of the nineteenth-century in his work.) The exhibition was organized by the Driehaus and is on view through September 29.

On the second segment, art historian and curator Bruce Edelstein discusses "Miraculous Encounters: Pontormo from Drawing to Painting" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition most prominently features Pontormo's Visitation (~1528-29) and a drawing for the work. Edelstein, the coordinator for graduate programs and advanced research at NYU in Florence, co-curated the presentation with the Getty's Davide Gasparotto. It is on view at the Getty through April 28. The excellent catalogue for the presentation, which includes a wealth of conservation-related information, was published by the Getty.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 12:24pm EDT

Episode No. 382 features artist Allen Ruppersberg and curator Lucinda Barnes.

The Hammer Museum is presenting "Allen Ruppersberg: Intellectual Property, 1968-2018." The exhibition is a retrospective that reveals Ruppersberg's pioneering role in the development of conceptual art and how he has advanced his ideas into painting, collage and installation in the decades since. It includes extensive presentation of both of Ruppersberg's most important and groundbreaking projects: Al's Cafe (1969), in which Ruppersberg created a cafe and served customers artist-made meals that included ingredients such as rocks and pine cones; and Al's Grand Hotel (1971), a fully functioning hotel (named after a 1932 MGM movie) with artist-designed rooms. The exhibition was curated by Siri Engberg with assistance from curatorial fellows Jordan Carter and Fabián Leyva-Barragán, and debuted at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. It is on view at the Hammer through May 12. The exhibition catalogue was published by the Walker. Amazon offers it for $41.

On the second segment, Lucinda Barnes discusses "Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction," a broad survey of Hofmann's painting from 1930 through the end of his life in 1966. The exhibition is at the Berkeley Art Museum through July 21, when it will travel to the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass. Hofmann was a German-born painter and teacher whose came to the United States in 1930, when he was 50 years old, to teach and to continue his career. The exhibition's excellent catalogue was published by University of California Press. Amazon offers it for $48.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:05am EDT

Episode No. 381 features artist Trevor Paglen and curator Nancy Edwards.

From Friday, Feb. 22, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego is presenting "Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen," a mid-career survey. Paglen's work examines the nexus of power, systems, state intelligence and the military, usually in an effort to make the invisible visible. Among the institutions devoting exhibitions to Paglen's art are the Vienna Secession, and the Kunstverein in Frankfurt. He's written five books and is a MacArthur 'genius' fellowship recipient. "Paglen" is at MCASD's downtown location through June 2. It was curated by John P. Jacob and organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which published the show's terrific catalogue. Amazon offers it for $37.

On the second segment, Kimbell Art Museum curator Nancy Edwards discusses "The Lure of Dresden: Bellotto at the Court of Saxony." The exhibition features onetime Canaletto studio-hand Bernardo Bellotto's extraordinary broad, yet detailed view paintings of Dresden and its environs. (Bellotto was the court painter in Dresden from roughly 1748-58.) The exhibition is on view through April 28. The excellent catalogue was published by Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden and Sandstein Verlag. Amazon offers it for $33.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEightyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 12:34pm EDT

Episode No. 380 is a holiday weekend clips episode featuring a previously recorded interview with curator Esther Adler.

With Sarah Kelly Oehler, Adler is the co-curator of "Charles White: A Retrospective" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The exhibition is the first major museum full-career survey of White's work in over three decades. It spotlights White's painting, drawing and photographs, and includes archival material especially related to his mural practice. "Charles White" is on view at LACMA from Sunday, February 17 through June 9, 2019. 

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredEighty.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:28pm EDT

Episode No. 379 features artist Amy Sherald and curator Iria Candela.

The Spelman College Museum of Fine Art is showing "Amy Sherald," an exhibition of recent paintings, through May 18. The exhibition was organized by the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and curated by its director, Lisa Melandri.

On the second segment, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Iria Candela discusses "Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold," a retrospective of the Argentine-Italian artist. The exhibition is primarily on view at the Met Breuer through April 14, but Fontana environments are also on view at the Met's Fifth Avenue building at the El Museo del Barrio. The catalogue was published by the Met and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $42.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:13am EDT

Episode No. 378 features historian Richard Fletcher and artist Sadie Barnette.

Yale University Press has just published "Cy Twombly: Fifty Days at Iliam," a monograph about Twombly's famed 1978 paintings series at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The book features the paintings and related works, as well as a conversation with Annabelle D‘Huart and essays by Carlos Basualdo, Emily Greenwood, Olena Chervonik, and Nicola Del Roscio and this week's guest, Richard Fletcher. Amazon offers it for $32.

Over the course of the ten paintings of "Fifty Days at Iliam," Twombly addresses the Trojan War through Alexander Pope’s 18th-century translation of Homer’s Iliad. Fletcher is a professor at The Ohio State University. His previous work has examined how contemporary artists have engaged with classical antiquity.

On the second segment, Sadie Barnette discusses her Dear 1968… on the occasion of an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego last year. The installation was the result of Barnette’s research into her family history, specifically her father’s participation in the Black Panther Party and the FBI’s surveillance of him. For images, please see the show page for Episode No. 350. Barnette is an Oakland-based artist whose work often explores urbanity, architecture, resistance and survival. "Phone Home," an exhibition of Barnette's recent work, is on view at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco through April 14.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:46pm EDT

Episode No. 377 features art historians Maxwell Anderson and Kellie Jones.

This week's episode spotlights two different approaches to addressing gaps in our understanding of American art history.

First, Souls Grown Deep Foundation president Maxwell Anderson discusses his organization's project to document, preserve and promote the work of artists from the African-American South and to more fully include their cultural traditions within American art. In 2014 Souls Grown Deep began a program to transfer the majority of the works in its collection -- by artists such as Ronald Lockett, Thornton Dial, Mary T. Smith, Joe Minter and the quiltmakers of the Gee's Bend community in Alabama -- to American and international art museums. So far Souls Grown Deep's efforts have led to the acquisition of hundreds of works by museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the High Museum of Art, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art and more. Many of those museums have organized exhibitions of those acquisitions. FAMSF's de Young Museum and the Met have included Souls Grown Deep-sourced works in a new, ongoing installations from their modern and contemporary collections.

Then, Kellie Jones, an art history professor at Columbia University, discusses the Getty Research Institute's new African American art history initiative. Jones is the senior consultant to the new program. It will acquire and make available artist archives, establish a dedicated curatorship in African American art history, make available annual research fellowships and conduct oral histories of key figures across the field. When the Getty announced the program it also announced it was acquiring the archive of Betye Saar, one of the most influential artists of the post-war period.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 7:19pm EDT

Episode No. 376 features artist Robert Pruitt and art historian Maggie Cao.

The California African American Museum is showing "Robert Pruitt: Devotion," a survey of Pruitt's large-scale drawing and sculpture that is installed with art that has informed Pruitt's work. The exhibition was curated by Mar Hollingsworth and will be on view through February 17.

Robert Pruitt's drawings, sculpture, animation and more brings together spiritual traditions, fictional narrative, technology and science fiction in a way that suggests new stories and new black identities. Pruitt has received solo shows at museums such as the Studio Museum in Harlem and the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita. His work is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the ICA Boston, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, the Studio Museum and more.

On the second segment, art historian Maggie Cao discusses her book "The End of Landscape in Nineteenth-Century America." The book, which was published by University of California Press, offers some ideas about why Cao thinks landscape declined as a subject of American art near the end of the nineteenth century. Amazon offers it for $59.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 7:14pm EDT

Episode No. 375 features curators Denise Murrell and Keith Davis.

Murrell is the curator of "Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today" at the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University. It examines the changing modes of representation of the black figure in modern and contemporary art, as well as the models' influence on the artists with whom they worked. The exhibition is on view in New York City through February 10 before traveling to the Musee d'Orsay in Paris. The outstanding catalogue for the exhibition was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $50.

Davis is the curator of "Structured Vision: The Photographs of Ralston Crawford" at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. The exhibition is a survey of Crawford's photographic practice, from his street photography to his pictures of dams and the Western landscape. It is on view through April 7. The excellent exhibition catalogue was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $47.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 11:27am EDT

Episode No. 374 features artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby and curator Laura Fry.

Njideka Akunyili Crosby's work is on view at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth in its latest "Focus" show, titled "Njideka Akunyili Crosby | Counterparts." MAMFW's "Focus" series is curated by Alison Hearst. "Crosby" originated at the Baltimore Museum of Art and curated by Kristen Hileman. The exhibition is on view in Fort Worth through January 13. Crosby has also designed a printed mural wrapped around the exterior of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles's Arata Isozaki-designed building.

Crosby's paintings typically feature elements such as textiles, printed media and flora from her experiences growing up in Nigeria and, now, living in the United States. Her solo show credits include the National Portrait Gallery, London; the Tang Museum at Skidmore College, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach and a Hammer "Projects" exhibition. In 2017 she was awarded a MacArthur 'genius' grant.

On the second segment, Gilcrease Museum curator Laura Fry discusses "Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West," which is at the Gilcrease in Tulsa, Oklahoma through February 10. The exhibition spotlights Bierstadt's depictions of native cultures of the Great Plains as well as his views that include American bison. The Gilcrease co-organized "Bierstadt" with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming. Peter H. Hassrick, the Buffalo Bill Center's director emeritus and senior scholar, curated it. The exhibition catalogue was published by University of Oklahoma Press. Amazon offers it for $35.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyFour.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:24pm EDT

Episode No. 373 is a holiday clips episode that features a previously aired conversation with artist Ursula von Rydingsvard.

The program was taped on the occasion of The Fabric Workshop and Museum's presentation of "Ursula von Rydingsvard: The Contour of Feeling," an exhibition of roughly 20 von Rydingsvards mostly made since 2000. The exhibition was curated by Mark Rosenthal.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyThree.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 6:05pm EDT

Episode No. 372 is a holiday clips episode featuring a previously aired conversation with artist Deborah Roberts.

Roberts recently won a 2018 Anonymous Was a Woman grant. The program provides an unrestricted grant that "enables women artists, over 40 years of age and at a significant juncture in their lives or careers, to continue to grow and pursue their work."

Roberts came onto the program in February, 2018 on the occasion of the Spelman College Museum of Art exhibition "Deborah Roberts: The Evolution of Mimi."

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyTwo.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 12:28pm EDT

Episode No. 371 features artist Kehinde Wiley and curator Alison de Lima Greene.

The Saint Louis Art Museum is presenting "Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis," an exhibition of 11 paintings for which Wiley chose his models from northern Saint Louis City and from Ferguson, in Saint Louis County, and posed them in ways informed by paintings in SLAM's collections. The exhibition was curated by Simon Kelley and Hannah Klemm, with assistance from Molly Moog. It's on view through February 10, 2019. An exhibition catalogue is forthcoming.

Wiley's work is also included in "People Get Ready: Building a Contemporary Collection" at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. (Curators Trevor Schoonmaker installed Wiley in the museum's European galleries.) "People Get Ready"  is on view through January 6, 2019.

Kehinde Wiley is the first African-American artist to paint an official U.S. Presidential portrait (Barack Obama) for the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. Wiley has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum, the Jewish Museum in New York City, the Columbus Museum of Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston curator Alison de Lima Greene discusses "Kindred Spirits: Louise Nevelson & Dorothy Hood." The exhibition presents the work of two mid-century artists who synthesized elements such as cubism and surrealism into American abstraction. The show is on view through February 3, 2010.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventyOne.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:19pm EDT

Episode No. 370 features artist Laura Owens and author Mark Lamster.

"Laura Owens," a survey of Owens's work since the mid-1990s, is on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary location through March 25, 2019. The exhibition, which was curated by Scott Rothkopf and originated at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, features about 60 paintings. The exhibition is accompanied by a book published by the Whitney. Amazon offers it for $30.

Throughout her career, Laura Owens has made paintings that address art history, how paintings are made, how images are produced and how painters have left marks on canvas, often within single artworks. Her previous museum exhibitions have come at MOCA (in 2003), the Fabric Workshop and Museum, the Bonnefanten Museum Maastricht, Kunsthalle Zurich, the Secession in Vienna and at The Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts at the California College for the Arts in San Francisco.

On the second segment, Mark Lamster discusses his new biography "The Man in the Glass House: Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century." The book, which was published by Little, Brown and Co., reveals how important the New York art world was to Johnson's professional rise, and how Johnson's affiliation with Nazis almost ended his architecture career before it began. Lamster is the architecture critic of the Dallas Morning News and he teaches at the University of Texas at Arlington. His previous books include "Master of Shadows: The Secret Diplomatic Career of Peter Paul Rubens," and "Spalding's World Tour: The Epic Adventure that Took Baseball Around the Globe - And Made It America's Game." Amazon offers "The Man in the Glass House" for $21.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSeventy.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 1:03pm EDT

Episode No. 369 features curators Thomas Kren and Karl Kusserow.

Kren is the lead curator of "The Renaissance Nude" at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Over the course of more than 100 paintings, prints and sculpture, the exhibition examines how artists represented the human figure between the early fifteenth and the early sixteenth centuries. The show was co-curated by Jill Burke, Stephen J. Campbell with assistance from Andrea Herrera and Thomas de Pasquale. "The Renaissance Nude" is on view through January 27, 2019. It is accompanied by a fantastic catalogue published by the Getty. Amazon offers it for $61.

On the second segment, Princeton University Art Museum curator Karl Kusserow discusses "Nature's Nation: American Art and Environment," an exhibition he co-curated with Alan C. Braddock. The exhibition offers an ecocritical take on the American landscape tradition through works by nineteenth-century painters, Native American basket-makers, photographers and more. It is on view at Princeton through January 6, 2019 before traveling to the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., and the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. The exhibition catalogue was published by the Princeton University Art Museum and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon lists it at $50.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSixtyNine.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 4:26pm EDT

Episode No. 368 is a Thanksgiving weekend clips episode featuring artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through December 31, 2019. Simmons is also included in a collection installation titled "I am you, you are too" at the Walker Art Center.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSixtyEight.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 10:52am EDT

Episode No. 367 features artist Charline von Heyl and art historian Rebecca Bedell.

Washington's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden is showing "Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes," a survey of paintings von Heyl has made since 2005.  The exhibition, which is on view through January 27, 2019, was curated by the Hirshhorn's Evelyn C. Hankins and Dirk Luckow of Hamburg's Deichtorhallen (with assistance from Sandy Guttman), which originated the exhibition. The exhibition catalogue was published by Delmonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $95.

von Heyl is a New York and Marfa-based abstract painter whose work engages art history and the way images are built and constructed. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions at museums such as the Tate Liverpool, the Kunsthalle Nurnberg, the ICA Boston, the ICA Philadelphia, the Vienna Secession and more. She was previously a guest on Episode No. 2 (!) of The MAN Podcast.

On the second segment, Rebecca Bedell discusses her new book Moved to Tears: Rethinking the Art of the Sentimental in the United States, a fresh assessment of art that was intended to prompt empathy, nostalgia and patriotism in the context of its time, but that has often been read as saccharine when considered through the standards of the present. Bedell teaches at Wellesley College. She is the author of The Anatomy of Nature: Geology and American Landscape Painting, 1825-1875 and the curator of the 2009 Fitzwilliam Museum exhibition "Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts." Moved to Tears was published by Princeton University Press. It is available from Amazon for $45.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSixtySeven.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 5:43pm EDT

Episode No. 366 features art historian John Klein and curator George Shackelford.

Klein is the author of "Matisse and Decoration," a new look at how Matisse's interest in the French decorative tradition informed and motivated his work throughout his career, but especially between 1935 and his death in 1954. The book details how Matisse translated decoration into easel painting, as well as into significant commissions for private individuals in the United States and Europe. The book also reveals how Matisse responded to the crisis of World War II and helped participate in France's post-war revival through decorative projects. The book was published by Yale University Press. It is available from Amazon for $39.

On the second segment, Kimbell Art Museum curator and senior deputy director George Shackelford discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a major Pierre Bonnard, Landscape at Le Cannet (1928). The painting, a four-foot-by-nine-foot Bonnardian address of the French decorative tradition, is now on view at the Kimbell.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSixtySix.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 8:26am EDT

Episode No. 365 features curator Esther Adler and artist Alida Cervantes.

With Sarah Kelly Oehler, Adler is the co-curator of "Charles White: A Retrospective" at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is the first major museum full-career survey of White's work in over three decades. It spotlights White's painting, drawing and photographs, and includes archival material especially related to his mural practice. "Charles White" is on view at MoMA through January 13, 2019, when it will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The exhibition catalogue was published by the Art Institute of Chicago, which originated the show, and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $34.

On the second segment, artist Alida Cervantes discusses her work on the occasion of "Being Here with You/ Estando aquí contigo" at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. The exhibition presents the work of 42 artists and collectives living and working in the San Diego and Tijuana region. The exhibition, which is at MCASD's downtown Jacobs Building, is on view through February 3, 2019. The exhibition catalogue is available at the museum. Concurrently, Cervantes's work is on view in in "Hello hero, hero hello. Hello Hero, Hello hello" at Efrain Lopez Projects in Chicago. It's up through November 10.

Direct download: MANPodcastEpisodeThreeHundredSixtyFive.mp3
Category:visual art -- posted at: 10:50am EDT